A review of the episode fry and the slurm factory

At his late Uncle Vladimir's estate, Bender is run over by a vicious Were-car, inheriting the curse.

A review of the episode fry and the slurm factory

When a script calls for a consumer product, and no one has offered the producers a Product Placement deal, a television program must resort to making up a brand — or, in some cases, obscuring a real brand so that it can't be identified.

Another technique is to make a lookalike that doesn't show the actual brand name — for instance, a bright-red soft drink can inscribedin white letters, "Cola"or using similar-sounding or similar-meaning words: Under Canadian broadcast regulations, product placement is considered a form of payola and is strictly forbidden.

To prevent even the appearance of product placement, real brand names can't be shown on locally-produced TV shows.

These rules don't affect imported shows, but "Canadian content" regulations limit the number of those that can be shown. In the UK, product placement was forbidden until Februarybut there's also the issue of "undue prominence", wherein a particular brand is, outside of any product placement agreement, given excessive exposure Mitchell and Webb noted this in great style with the conclusion that a porn scene about a satellite TV installer would have to be a gang-bang to ensure no single brand was given undue prominence.

Sometimes fictional products can become story elements in and of themselves, either as part of the "world background" of a show, or as running gags. Films with blatant product placements, such as The Thomas Crown Affairusually have them obscured when they are syndicated.

In addition to Brand X, some movie and TV producers may choose to use discontinued products as a point of style. Quentin Tarantino is known for using boxes of discontinued cereal in his movies, such as "Fruit Brute" Which has since been recontinued.

At one time this was a universal practice in advertising, allowing a marketer to compare his product to a competitor without actually naming the competitor and reminding the viewer of why he might prefer it.

The competitor would often be referred to as "the leading brand", giving rise to the question, "if your product is so good, why is the other brand leading? There was also the Pepsi Challenge where Pepsi ran ads showing in blind taste tests, people preferred Pepsi over Coke.

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However, in some cases it may be mandatory. For example, in Germany it used to be against the law to compare your product to a competitor's product when it was identifiable. Even now, the "laws against unfair competition" allow only verifiable objective comparisons without diminishing the competitor, legally regulated to a point where advertisers rather take a pass on comparisons than risk exposing themselves to lawsuits.

In some kinds of advertisement, items other than the one advertised that would normally be used in its own branded packaging will be found in some kind of neutral or unbranded packaging. The most common examples of this are advertisements for cereals, in which milk will be poured from clear glass jugs rather than the carton or bottle it is sold in.

It is probable that this is done in order to reuse the advertisement in different countries as much as for avoiding giving exposure to those other products.

Incidentally, the notion of using fake brands that resemble the real brand Using a pear instead of an applefor instance is being seen by marketers as something that improves awareness of the real brand. Amusingly, they're calling it Product Displacement.

Some of them especially during the early iMac's time will also bear a strong resemblance in other ways: Many of these will cross with Bland-Name Product by being called Pineapple brand computers.

Of course, there are also some non-disguised references to Apple computers, such as a small picture of an iMac with an Apple advertising slogan. Incidentally, Lain's Navi is based on a Mac, albeit an even older one than the iMac: In Digimon Adventurethe brand of laptop Koushiro used was never named, but it looked like an iBook and had a pineapple symbol on it; this led to it being nicknamed the "PiBook" in fandom.

Averted in the Short Anime Movieswhich all use real computers running a Windows 95 variant and are accurately branded as such. The newspaper comic FoxTrot does this with the "iFruit" brand, whose computers were originally shaped like the fruits they're named after.

Which is later replaced, in the "redesign" e-mail, with either a G5 or first-generation Intel iMac.

A review of the episode fry and the slurm factory

Steve Jobs is, consequently, a rabbit. Rob in Get Fuzzy has a Pear laptop. So does Stephan in Ozy and Millieand his thoroughly resembles a tangerine iBook. Pear computers show up as a running gag in shows produced by Dan Schneider, such as Zoey and iCarly.

The latter expanded the Pear product line with other parodies of Apple products, including the PearPod, the PearPhone, and the PearPad which is literally a pear-shaped tablet. In the same show, someone is looking things up on " Realpedia ".

Probably the ur- and most famous example predates the iMac by over a decade: Adventure Time makes use of the "Pear Computer" Brand name in episode: Gnomeo and Juliet featured another laptop computer with a banana on it. Higgsby using a laptop with a strawberry logo. In one episode of Axis Powers HetaliaSealand is excitedly noticing that Iceland is being auctioned off while using a laptop with two cherries as its logo.

Grand Theft Auto IV features advertisements and an in-game website for Fruit Computers, whose logo is a bowl of fruit and released a phone that looks exactly like a banana-shaped iPhone.Futurama is an American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Broadcasting caninariojana.com series follows the adventures of slacker Philip J.

Fry, who is accidentally transported to the 31st century and finds work at an interplanetary delivery caninariojana.com series was envisioned by Groening in the mids while working on The Simpsons; he brought David X.

Cohen aboard to . In the episode, "Fry and the Slurm Factory," a character named Professor Farnsworth points his F-ray at the head of the show's famously ill-tempered robot, Bender. It reveals a little rectangle, apparently a chip, labeled "". In this episode, Fry is addicted to a drink named Slurm.

Slurm is having a competition, where you can win tickets to tour the Slurm Factory. So, Fry uses all of his might and eventually, he finds one of the winning soda cans.

In depth information about Fry And The Slurm Factory, produced by 20th Century Fox Television, Curiosity Company, Rough Draft Studios. Download Cartoon Now Online. Futurama Episode Guide.

In the UK, product placement was forbidden until February , but there's also the issue of "undue prominence", wherein a particular brand is, outside of any product placement agreement, given excessive exposure (Mitchell and Webb noted this in great style with the conclusion that a porn scene about a satellite TV installer would have to be a gang-bang to ensure no single brand was given.

Talk:Roswell That Ends Well The episode "Fry and the Slurm Factory" implies that the F-ray sterilized Fry. But later in "Roswell That Ends Well" Fry father's his father. About halfway through the episode, just after Fry's grandfather is killed in the nuclear blast and he returns to the malt shop to tell the news to Leela and the.

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